DNP acts against tiger exploitation in Thailand

June 09 2016

After uncovering shocking evidence that suggests cruelty, illegal breeding, and wildlife trafficking at the ‘Tiger Temple’, the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP) has committed to investigate all other tiger entertainment venues in Thailand.

The DNP says it will close down any venues found to be exploiting tigers in what could be a first step towards ending tiger exploitation in Thailand. 

The DNP have committed to ensuring that the 147 tigers confiscated from the Tiger Temple will not be sold back into the entertainment industry. They will begin immediate improvements to the confiscation centers to ensure the tigers receive adequate veterinary care and food, and will collaborate with us to do this. 

Next, read about the recent raid of the Tiger Temple where forty dead cubs were found.

We welcome this announcement as a step towards ending the exploitation of wildlife in Thailand, but we urge the authorities to go further and to extend the scope of their investigations, and to ban the breeding of tigers in these venues. 

“The DNP have heeded our call and public petition. We welcome this announcement to investigate all tiger entertainment venues. We urge them to thoroughly investigate not just trafficking, but all activities including cruelty and the illegal breeding of tigers for commercial gain, and to close down all venues that are exploiting tigers. Our research shows that hundreds of tigers suffer at venues that offer tiger entertainment in Thailand. The lucrative business of exploiting tigers for profit must end,” said Am Last, Director of World Animal Protection Thailand.

Ensuring that the tigers seized from the temple do not return to cruel wildlife entertainment venues is of the utmost importance. “We are determined to ensure that the DNP will not return the confiscated tigers from the Tiger Temple to a lifetime of cruelty in the wildlife entertainment industry. We will work with DNP to improve the immediate care of the tigers in the confiscation centres. Staff from World Animal Protection will visit these tigers to monitor their welfare, and will work alongside the DNP and other groups on a long-term strategy for helping these and other tigers in Thailand,” Last continued. 

“We are moving to take action in the industry and to put an end to the exploitation of tigers for trafficking and commercial gain. We are working closely with the Royal Thai Police to investigate the activities at the Tiger Temple, as well as other venues that may be involved."

The DNP has stated commitment to the welfare of the 147 tigers. “In the immediate future, we will ensure that the 147 tigers that we have confiscated will be well looked after. In the meantime, there are no plans to return these tigers to the wildlife entertainment industry,” said Mr. Thanya Netithammakun, Director-General of DNP.

Netithammakun expressed gratitude for our efforts to protect tigers from cruel wildlife entertainment venues. “We are appreciative of World Animal Protection’s support and expertise to improve their welfare, and we will work with World Animal Protection and other groups on a long-term strategy and solution for these tigers.”

For more information on our work to keep tigers out of cruel tourist attractions visit our Wildlife Not Entertainers page.

“We are appreciative of World Animal Protection’s support and expertise to improve their welfare, and we will work with World Animal Protection and other groups on a long-term strategy and solution for these tigers.”

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